Other Animals

[embedded content] Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Video: Mike Fernández/Audubon. Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Hummingbirds may be some of the smallest birds in the world, but fluttering those tiny wings can be quite a workout. Flapping away at up to 90 beats per second burns up calories fast; to maintain their momentum, hummingbirds need to eat—a lot! To satisfy their speedy metabolisms, these
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Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Richard Pick/Audubon Photography Awards FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Today, the Bureau of Land Management released final versions of land-management plans for the sagebrush ecosystem nearly two years after beginning the process to rewrite a historic 2015 agreement on sage-grouse conservation for an approach that elevates short-term development interests above all others. “What
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Counting birds and tracking how habitats change sound like easy tasks. But after a natural disaster when travel is difficult or dangerous, it can be anything but. Audubon’s Science team recently began testing artificial intelligence in an attempt to improve bird identification software, and developed a land cover-classification algorithm that assesses landscape and foliage change after natural disturbances. Together,
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You might have a cockatoo in your home without even knowing it! Yes, your diminutive cockatiel—the most popular pet bird in the US—is, in fact, related to the much larger cockatoo. Seriously; there are 21 species of cockatoo and the cockatiel, also referred to simply as the ‘tiel,  is one of them. The cockatiel is
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Thunder and lightning boom and crackle overhead. Snapped cables dangle from what was a 10,000-volt electric fence. A massive dinosaur stalks out of the jungle, stomping through the now-useless barrier and revealing a mouthful of knife-sharp, banana-size teeth. It lets out a blood-curdling roar. Soon after, a man gets eaten off a toilet.  This is how we meet Tyrannosaurus rex
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Rock Pigeons. Photo: Paul Farnfield/Alamy This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of the National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide. Transcript: This is BirdNote. Birds lay eggs. That means they don’t nurse their young… right? Well, have you ever heard of something called “pigeon milk?”
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Great Egret. Photo: Evelyn Smialek/Audubon Photography Awards WASHINGTON — “Year after year, Congress has doubled down on its investment in our cherished landscapes, rejecting administration budget proposals that would devastate the protections and places that both birds and people need,” said Sarah Greenberger, National Audubon Society’s senior vice president of conservation policy, upon release of
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Iceland’s being condemned for recently approving the killing of hundreds whales over the next five years. The International Whaling Commission (IWC) banned commercial whaling in 1986, but like Japan, Iceland continued to use the scientific whaling loophole. After leaving the IWC in the 1990s in protest and returning in 2002, Iceland resumed scientific whaling in
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For nearly two decades, the federal Roadless Rule has prohibited road-building and timber harvesting on nearly 60 million acres of the country’s most pristine national forest land. Among the areas currently protected is more than half of the nearly 17-million-acre Tongass National Forest, part of the largest remaining temperate rainforest on Earth. But now, conservationists
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When conservation ecologist Clark Rushing set out to study Painted Buntings a few years ago, he stumbled on an enigma: where exactly the birds go in winter and in what numbers. Each piece of evidence seemed to raise more questions than it answered, deepening the migration uncertainty surrounding the dazzling—yet declining—songbirds.   Painted Buntings are well-documented in their breeding territory
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Arizona Wilderness Brewing Company’s Hummingbird Springs sour saison, the Western Rivers Brewers’ Council’s first collaborative brew, celebrates International Migratory Bird Day and Audubon’s Plants for Birds initiative. Photo: Mike Fernandez/Audubon After the Arizona legislature reached a historic agreement with the Drought Contingency Plan (DCP), Audubon Arizona remains focused on water policy that benefits rivers, economies, habitats, birds, and other wildlife.
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