Other Animals

A sodium craving may be the reason endangered mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda leave the park to raid nearby eucalyptus plantations, according to a recent paper published in Biotropica. Tourists from around the world pay $1,500 for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to spend just an hour with these majestic great
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Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Winona LaDukeWinona LaDuke  is a rural development economist working on issues of economic, food, and energy sovereignty. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and leads several organizations including Honor the Earth, Anishinaabe Agriculture Institute, Akiing, and Winona’s Hemp.  These organizations develop and model cultural-based sustainable development
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Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Photo: Randy Streufert/Audubon Photography Awards This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of the National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide. Transcript: This is BirdNote. Blue-gray Gnatcatchers are little birds that can be hard to spot as they forage busily amid dense leaves overhead.
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[embedded content] Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Video: Mike Fernández/Audubon. Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Hummingbirds may be some of the smallest birds in the world, but fluttering those tiny wings can be quite a workout. Flapping away at up to 90 beats per second burns up calories fast; to maintain their momentum, hummingbirds need to eat—a lot! To satisfy their speedy metabolisms, these
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Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Richard Pick/Audubon Photography Awards FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Today, the Bureau of Land Management released final versions of land-management plans for the sagebrush ecosystem nearly two years after beginning the process to rewrite a historic 2015 agreement on sage-grouse conservation for an approach that elevates short-term development interests above all others. “What
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Counting birds and tracking how habitats change sound like easy tasks. But after a natural disaster when travel is difficult or dangerous, it can be anything but. Audubon’s Science team recently began testing artificial intelligence in an attempt to improve bird identification software, and developed a land cover-classification algorithm that assesses landscape and foliage change after natural disturbances. Together,
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You might have a cockatoo in your home without even knowing it! Yes, your diminutive cockatiel—the most popular pet bird in the US—is, in fact, related to the much larger cockatoo. Seriously; there are 21 species of cockatoo and the cockatiel, also referred to simply as the ‘tiel,  is one of them. The cockatiel is
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Thunder and lightning boom and crackle overhead. Snapped cables dangle from what was a 10,000-volt electric fence. A massive dinosaur stalks out of the jungle, stomping through the now-useless barrier and revealing a mouthful of knife-sharp, banana-size teeth. It lets out a blood-curdling roar. Soon after, a man gets eaten off a toilet.  This is how we meet Tyrannosaurus rex
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Rock Pigeons. Photo: Paul Farnfield/Alamy This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of the National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide. Transcript: This is BirdNote. Birds lay eggs. That means they don’t nurse their young… right? Well, have you ever heard of something called “pigeon milk?”
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Great Egret. Photo: Evelyn Smialek/Audubon Photography Awards WASHINGTON — “Year after year, Congress has doubled down on its investment in our cherished landscapes, rejecting administration budget proposals that would devastate the protections and places that both birds and people need,” said Sarah Greenberger, National Audubon Society’s senior vice president of conservation policy, upon release of
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