Month: March 2019

(Picture Credit: Getty Images) Do you have a velcro dog? Dogs are pack animals, and you are your pack’s leader. It’s natural for your dog to want to follow you. While some dogs follow their owners everywhere they go out of sheer love, sometimes the reason why dogs stick to their owners like velcro is
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A sodium craving may be the reason endangered mountain gorillas (Gorilla beringei beringei) from Volcanoes National Park in Rwanda leave the park to raid nearby eucalyptus plantations, according to a recent paper published in Biotropica. Tourists from around the world pay $1,500 for the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to spend just an hour with these majestic great
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Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Winona LaDukeWinona LaDuke  is a rural development economist working on issues of economic, food, and energy sovereignty. She lives and works on the White Earth reservation in northern Minnesota, and leads several organizations including Honor the Earth, Anishinaabe Agriculture Institute, Akiing, and Winona’s Hemp.  These organizations develop and model cultural-based sustainable development
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Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. Photo: Randy Streufert/Audubon Photography Awards This audio story is brought to you by BirdNote, a partner of the National Audubon Society. BirdNote episodes air daily on public radio stations nationwide. Transcript: This is BirdNote. Blue-gray Gnatcatchers are little birds that can be hard to spot as they forage busily amid dense leaves overhead.
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[embedded content] Ruby-throated Hummingbirds. Video: Mike Fernández/Audubon. Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Hummingbirds may be some of the smallest birds in the world, but fluttering those tiny wings can be quite a workout. Flapping away at up to 90 beats per second burns up calories fast; to maintain their momentum, hummingbirds need to eat—a lot! To satisfy their speedy metabolisms, these
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Greater Sage-Grouse. Photo: Richard Pick/Audubon Photography Awards FORT COLLINS, Colo. — Today, the Bureau of Land Management released final versions of land-management plans for the sagebrush ecosystem nearly two years after beginning the process to rewrite a historic 2015 agreement on sage-grouse conservation for an approach that elevates short-term development interests above all others. “What
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