Other Animals

MISSION, TEXAS—The Rio Grande Valley in southern Texas is an ecological crossroads unlike anywhere else in the country. Here, Gulf Coast prairies meet South Texas brush country, the Central Flyway meets the Mississippi Flyway, and the United States meets Mexico. Along the Rio Grande’s banks survive the world’s last relicts of subtropical thorn forest, and
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The Arabian Green Bee-eater is usually treated as conspecific with M. viridissimus and M. orientalis, but differs from both in its very short stub-ended central tail feathers; bright blue forehead, supercilium and throat, and bluer lower belly; broader, smudgier black breast-bar; marginally larger size and clearly longer tail (minus the tail extensions) than the other
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At first glance, a December 28 announcement from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency looked like an outlier in the Trump administration’s pattern of repealing regulations. A press release said the agency planned to revise an Obama-era air pollution rule, but emphasized with bold type that its limits on mercury and other toxic emissions “would remain in
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What do birds look for in a mate? For female budgies, problem-solving ability appears to make males more attractive. From a revolutionary stand point, it might serve birds well to opt for partners that show good foraging prowess. See the tricky wa[https://www.forbes.com/sites/grrlscientist/2019/01/10/problem-solving-budgies-make-more-attractive-mates/#4c085b836407]y researchers got female budgies to ditch their preferred mates to those trained to
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For birds and humans alike, bathing is one of the essential elements of day-to-day living. And like us, some birds like it, and some tolerate it—some even hate it. If you peruse YouTube, you’ll find more than a few videos of owners and their exotic birds bathing in a variety of ways. Some take showers;
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Any day now. That’s when Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bsal), the “salamander-eating” fungus, is expected to arrive in the United States, home to more than a third of the world’s species of these slippery amphibians.It all began in 2008, when Bsal traveledsome through the pet trade from Asia to northern Europe. There, it escaped into the wild
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Peruvian fishermen slaughtered dolphins to use as bait for shark fishing, an undercover investigation has revealed. Footage showed infant and adult dolphins being harpooned then stabbed and clubbed before, in some cases, being cut open and butchered while still alive. The slaughtered dolphins were cut up and used as bait. Dolphins are also killed for
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Wilson’s Warbler. Photo: Camilla Cerea/Audubon Thank you for considering a gift of real estate to Audubon! There are two types of real estate that donors most often want to leave: 1. Land that donors would like to see permanently protected. We receive many offers, but are not able to manage and sustain all of the
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Killdeer. Photo: Harry Colquhoun/Audubon Photography Awards Good news: The ability to make this gift directly from IRA accounts is now a permanent part of the U.S. tax code. The rule applies to individuals age 70½ and older, who may make income tax‐free outright gifts up to $100,000 from their IRAs to charities. The gift amount
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Illustration: Brandon Ballengée The last Passenger Pigeon on earth, a female named Martha, died 100 years ago at the Cincinnati Zoo, where she had lived for all of her 29 years. Artist and Audubon Toyota TogetherGreen fellow Brandon Ballengée’s response to the species loss is Frameworks of Absence, a series he created by physically cutting
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